Salah sees red over wages 

By Tomas Queface March 25, 2022
Egypt and Liverpool striker Mo Salah Egypt and Liverpool striker Mo Salah

The Egyptian forward threatens to leave Liverpool unless dispute is resolved, reports Tomas Queface.

 
Egyptian striker Mohamed Salah's contract with Liverpool has been a hot topic for several months.

The fact is that the African star is not willing to accept the offer with the current terms proposed by Liverpool and negotiations have been stalled since December 2021.

The Reds maintain the offer placed in December, while the Egyptian international insists that, given his importance to Jurgen Klopp's plans, it should be significantly increased.

Negotiations between the two parties have reportedly suffered a potentially irreparable breakdown due to a financial gap between the two parties, according to the British newspaper The Guardian. Salah is expecting a 150 per cent increase in his salary, taking his weekly earnings to £500,000, just over $650,000.

However, the last offer proposed to Salah was for £334,000 per week ($436,000), something that was not accepted by the Liverpool star.

If the negotiations between Salah and the Reds do not have a satisfactory outcome for both parties, the Egyptian said he has no other solution but to leave the club, which could happen at the end of this season, at zero cost.

Speaking about the dispute, Liverpool's German manager, Jurgen Klopp, said: 'Everything is fine from my point of view. Nothing has happened, neither a signature nor a refusal. We have to wait, there is no hurry for the decision.'

The Egyptian's departure in June 2023 would be felt hard by the club.

His form on the field is on the rise. Salah scored Liverpool's 2,000th goal in the Premier League, in March; Liverpool is only the second club to reach the mark in the Premier League era, which began in the 1992/1993 season.

As well as adding to his club's tally, Salah also celebrated his 20th goal in the current Premier League, a tally he has reached for the fourth time in five years.